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Radiation-induced fibrosis is a multi-billion dollar industry, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its pathophysiology are poorly understood. Darren B. Abbas @AbbasDarren and his co-authors from the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine @LongakerLab at Stanford University @StanfordPlastic studied the effects of radiation damage on the dorsal skin of wild-type mice. They found 5 transcriptionally distinct fibroblast subpopulations that dynamically alter their expression throughout the time course of radiation wound healing. Additionally, these subpopulations clonally proliferate in the acute phase while giving rise to one dominant clone by the chronic phase of radiation wound healing. Dynamic fibroblast sub-populations during dorsal skin irradiation wound healing in wild-type mice Darren B. Abbas, MD @AbbasDarren; Christopher V. Lavin, MS @ChrisVannLavin; Evan J. Fahy, MB BCh BAO MCh; Michelle Griffin, MBChB, PhD; Sandeep Adem, MS; Shamik Mascharak, BS; Nestor M. Diaz Deleon, BS; Megan King, BS; Daniel Lee, MD @dle48; Michael T. Longaker, MD, MBA; Derrick C. Wan MD Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine @LongakerLab, Stanford University School of Medicine @StanfordSurgery @StanfordMed

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