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Research Spotlight With Commentary By Christopher Forrest

Osteoprotegrin reduces osteoclast resorption activity without affecting osteogenesis on nanoparticulate mineralized collagen scaffolds.
Xiaoyan Ren, Russell Reid, and Justine Lee - UCLA Plastic Surgery

In their recent report in Science Advances published in June 2019, Dr. Justine Lee and her laboratory at the UCLA Molecular Biology Institute continue to build upon their fascinating work investigating the efficacy of nanoparticulate mineralized collagen glycosaminoglycan (MC-GAG) scaffolds as stimulators of bone regeneration. Read about their novel approach to regulating osteoclast differentiation to increase activation of osteogenic mediators. Their groundbreaking findings demonstrate that expression of osteoprotegrin can inhibit osteoclast activity while osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells on a MC-GAG scaffold remain largely unaffected, suggesting that the two processes can be separated to augment bone regeneration. We encourage you to read the entirety of their manuscript.
Osteoprotegrin reduces osteoclast resorption activity without affecting osteogenesis on nanoparticulate mineralized collagen scaffolds.

COMMENTARY: The challenge of replacing missing bone continues to remain elusive. Autogenous bone replacement is limited by donor site morbidity, the need for complex 3D anatomical replacement, and significant variability in resorption. Alloplastic reconstructions are expensive and lack the ability for true biocompatibility and osseointegration. The promise of cell-mediated technology in this field is alluring and the work done by Dr. Lee and her group manipulating the RANK/RANKL/OPG axis with the assistance of MC-GAG scaffolds and the delivery of an anti-osteoclastogenic decoy receptor to understand the role of osteoclast inactivation brings us closer to the concept of bone in a box. Bone homeostasis is a remarkably complex biomechanism and the authors have used ingenious and novel methodologies to demonstrate one possible limb to encourage bone regeneration. It is an exciting time in bone biologic research, and I encourage you to read the full text of their manuscript.

Christopher R. Forrest, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FACS
Professor and Chair, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto
Medical Director, The Centre for Craniofacial Care and Research, Hospital for Sick Children


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