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Dr. Jordan Steinberg

Dr. Jordan Steinberg Assistant Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Director of Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery
Johns Hopkins


Dr. Jordan Steinberg
Assistant Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Director of Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery
Johns Hopkins

About Dr. Jordan Steinberg:

Undergraduate: Duke University
Medical School: Johns Hopkins (MD/PhD)
Residency: Northwestern University
Fellowship: Craniofacial Surgery – Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

Current Research Interests
Clinical outcomes of cleft and congenital craniofacial procedures

Pediatric exposure to radiation from imaging
Craniosynostosis

What are your long-term research interests?
I’d like to create a link between my former world (PhD in Neuroscience) and the current one and explore my interest in the cognitive outcomes of craniosynostosis. When I did my basic science research, I looked at neuroplasticity and synapses. In the clinical world, we do surgeries for patients with craniosynostosis to achieve a better head shape, but a major unanswered question is how does this impact learning and cognition?

Why did you join the PSRC?
I’ve always been interested in those plastic surgeons that think about problems from a rigorous scientific standpoint. I have an identification with people who consider clinical problems from the ‘ground up’ rather than going back the other way. It’s interesting to see, on a collaborative basis, from whom I might get some advice as I navigate the early part of my academic career.

The advising is one of the main advantages I saw. Of all the societies, the PSRC has the most organized mentoring program supporting plastic surgeons from a very early time point. The PSRC lets me link with my colleagues who are academic role models.

Did you know you wanted to be a plastic surgeon during your PhD training?
When I was a graduate student, I thought I would go into neurology, but the hands-on animal work made me appreciate the practice of surgery. And I connected with former classmates who had gone into plastic surgery. The problem-solving and innovation made plastic surgery a natural path for scientist.

What advice would you give to an aspiring plastic surgeon?
Plastic surgery still remains a very dynamic and interesting field. No two patients or surgeries are exactly the same. Getting involved early with good mentors, particularly through the PSRC, is helpful and will keep you on your toes. There are always new things that I feel I need to learn and improve. That is what we all should aspire to do.


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