PSRC Main Site  |  Past & Future Meetings
Plastic Surgery Research Council

Back to 2020 ePosters


Seasonal Variation In Hospitalizations For Burn Injuries
Artem Shmelev, MD, Emmanuel Robinson, MD, Charles Scott Hultman, MD, Mohammed Asif, MD.
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

PURPOSE:
Seasonal variation in traumatic injuries is a known phenomenon, but published data from large scale studies on burn hospitalization rates is sparse. We aimed to describe trends and seasonality in burns admissions using largest available administrative U.S. database with respect to percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) involved.
METHODS:
Study population was obtained from National Inpatient Sample 2000-2015 and included all primary admissions for burn injuries (n= 490,247). Monthly hospitalization rates were calculated and seasonal trend decomposition was performed, including subgroup analysis by TBSA.
RESULTS:
The highest hospitalization rate was observed during summer months, with a peak in July. Seasonal differences were significant for burns with TBSA 10-39%. Seasonal amplitude accounts for 28% of total burns hospitalization rates. Increase of annual trends (2000-2015) reached significance for burns with TBSA <10% and ≥40%, while admission rate for burns with TBSA 10-39% remain stable. Patients, admitted during summer months were more frequently younger males, had burns with TBSA >10%, shorter length of hospitalization and lower in-hospital mortality, compared to other seasons (all p<0.001).
CONCLUSION:
Observed seasonal variation in burns incidence could be related to summer peak in outdoors grilling and fire activities, although the mechanism of injury can not be captured by administrative databases.


Back to 2020 ePosters