Plastic Surgery Research Council

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Home Is Where The job Is:Where To Start Looking for an Academic Plastic Surgery Position
Adam D. Glener, MD, Steven R. Glener, BS, Ronnie L. Shammas, MD, Elliot Le, BS, Kristen Rezak, MD, Brett T. Phillips, MD.
Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

PURPOSE: With the increasing competitiveness for academic plastic surgery jobs, residents are more commonly pursuing an academic track earlier in their training. However, little has been published describing attributes that encourage employment at an academic institution. This study aimed to describe the training patterns of academic plastic surgeons so as to better inform trainees with early interest in pursuing and academic career.
METHODS: All full time faculty (n=628) at currently accredited integrated plastic surgery programs (n=79) were included in the study; clinical affiliates were excluded. These institutions' websites were then queried to obtain the training history of the surgeons meeting inclusion criteria. Data was entered into a centralized database from which descriptive statistics were obtained.
RESULTS: Of the 628 surgeons included in the study, 423 (67.3%) completed the independent training track (general surgery followed by plastic surgery) and 105 (32.7%) completed the integrated plastic surgery track. Additionally, 447 surgeons (71.1%) completed at least one post-residency fellowship. Of those completing the independent track, 18.7% and 31.2% are employed at the same institution where they completed general surgery and plastic surgery residency, respectively. Of those completing the integrated track, 37.1% are employed at the same institution where they graduated from plastic surgery residency. Lastly, 21% of fellowship- trained plastic surgeons are now employed at the same institution where they completed post-residency fellowship.
CONCLUSION: Academic surgeons are often employed at institutions where they have formerly trained. Therefore, trainees with early interest in pursuing academic careers should consider where they train. Additionally, the overwhelming majority of academic plastic surgeons have completed post-residency fellowship training.


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