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The Effects of Adipose Derived Stromal Cells on SAS Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Dre M. Irizarry, MD, John Flacco, BS, Charles P. Blackshear, MD, Elizabeth A. Brett, MS, Natalie N. Chung, BS, Cristhian F. Montenegro, MS, Dung Nguyen, MD, PharmD, Natalina Quarto, PhD, Amato J. Giaccia, PhD, Michael T. Longaker, MD, MBA, FACS, Derrick C. Wan, MD.
Stanford, Stanford, CA, USA.

Purpose:
Many oncologic surgeries create significant defects with a need for reconstruction. Cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL) has shown promise for fat graft retention in reconstructive surgery. However, mesenchymal stem cells have been shown in breast and other cancers to promote tumor proliferation and metastasis, thus leading to concern for utilizing CAL following oncologic surgery. In contrast, there is little information regarding the effect of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). While Rowan et al. showed no increase in Cal-27 and SCC-4 HNSCC tumor growth with ASCs, an increase in micrometastasis was noted when these HNSCC cells were co-injected with ASCs. As a multitude of other HNSCC cell lines exist, there is still much to be examined regarding the effect of ASCs on HNSCC.
Methods:
SAS HNSCC was grown in culture with either regular media, tumor conditioned media, or ASC conditioned media. Tumor cells were lifted and counted in triplicate every other day for 9 days post plating. For the in-vivo arm, 5X105 GFP labeled SAS HNSCC cells were injected into the subcutaneous plane of the scalp of immunocompromised mice either alone, in addition to a 200uL fat graft, or in addition to a 200uL fat graft and 10,000 ASCs. CT scans were taken weekly for 4 weeks, and subsequently tumors and grafts were explanted, digested, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was performed.
Results:
At three weeks, there was significantly greater tumor volume by microCT in mice receiving cancer cells with fat graft and ASCs relative to mice receiving cancer cells only and cancer cells plus flat graft. Additionally, the cancer cells plated with ASC conditioned media show greater proliferation than the cancer cells plated with either regular media or tumor conditioned media.
Conclusions:
Our results show that there is increased SAS HNSCC growth when in the presence of ASCs in-vivo, and ASC conditioned media in-vitro. While further studies are necessary, reconstruction using CAL following oncologic surgery for SAS HNSCC can potentially increase residual cancer cell growth.


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