Plastic Surgery Research Council
Members Only  |  Contact  |  PSRC on Facebook
PSRC 60th Annual Meeting
Program and Abstracts

Back to 2015 Annual Meeting Program


Malignant Melanoma Thickness and Risk of Future Malignancies
Katie Young, BSc, MBChB1, 2; Alexander Ives, BSc3; Tim Jones, BSc, PHD3; Julia Verne, BSc MBBS, MSc, PhD, FFPH3; Alex Varey, MBChB, PhD, MRCS2; Yoav Ben-Shlomo, MBBS, MSc, PhD, MRCP1
1University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, United Kingdom, 2North Bristol NHS Trust, Department of Plastic Surgery, Bristol, United Kingdom, 3Public Health England South West, Bristol, United Kingdom

Introduction: Malignant melanoma has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of developing further primary malignancies. We hypothesised that an increase in melanoma Breslow thickness would further increase the risk of subsequent primary malignancies.
Material and Methods: A retrospective cohort study, all malignant melanomas diagnosed in England between 1996 and 2005 with a minimum five-year follow up period, using the English National Cancer Data Repository. The exposure was defined as Breslow thickness of initial malignant melanoma. All further primary malignancies were identified. Standardised Incidence Ratios (SIRs) were calculated adjusting for gender, age, follow up period and income-based deprivation. Poisson regression was used to determine risk associated with Breslow thickness.
Results: The cohort consisted of 61,201 malignant melanomas, (438,515 person years), in which 6,684 further primary malignancies were diagnosed. We observed an increased risk for all other non-skin malignancies (117%; 95% CI 114%-120%). Amongst the ten most common non-skin malignancies, the following showed the greatest increased risk: multiple myeloma (221%), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (167%) and renal (149%). We found a dose response effect with Breslow thickness for melanoma (p value for trend <0.0001) and all non-skin malignancies (p value for trend <0.0001).
Conclusion: Breslow thickness is a prognostic indicator for melanoma risk and also some other malignancies. Developing a greater understanding of the associations between multiple malignancies may guide research into susceptibility germline mutations and/or shared environmental factors.


Back to 2015 Annual Meeting Program