Plastic Surgery Research Council
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PSRC 60th Annual Meeting

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Decellularized Porcine Stomach Extracellular Matrix for Tissue Engineering and Repair
Lina Wang, PhD, Joshua Johnson, MS, Qixu Zhang, MD, PhD.
MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Purpose: Repair of large size musculofascial defects, such as ventral hernia, is still a challenge for reconstructive surgery. This study aims to develop a new platform - decellularized porcine smooth muscle-fascia-based matrix (PDSM) system - for musculofasical defect repair and regeneration. Methods: Musculafasical layer from porcine stomach, composed of a thin fascia layer, three layers of smooth muscle tissues, and a thin loose connective tissue layer, was processed by decellularization. Resultant PDSM was comprehensively characterized with respect to its biochemical component by immunohistochemistry, three-dimensional (3D) structure by scanning electron microscope, mechanical properties by mechanical test, cytotoxicity by live cell staining, cell-substrate interaction by immunofluorescent staining, and in vivo immunoresponse by immunohistochemistry. PDSM and combination of PDSM and multiple cells (i.e. human adipose-derived stem cells [hASCs] and human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]) were applied to repair full thickness abdominal wall defect in vivo. Results: PDSM maintained intact 3D structure of extracellular matrix and biochemical components such as collagen, laminin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan, but lacked major histocompatibility complex antigen 1. PDSM presented strong ultimate tensile strength (UTS) (5.52 ± 0.32 MPa) and elastic modulus (E) (6.76 ± 1.35 MPa), and showed high strain at failure (1.07 ± 0.12). PDSM provides a suitable microenvironment for hASC integration, proliferation, and patterning. In addition, in vitro studies showed that PDSM induced HUVECs formed vascular structure formation in the presence of hASCs. In vivo animal test demonstrated that PDSM did not cause immunogenic response (a few CD68+, CD4+ and CD8+) in Fischer rats. In vivo studies also showed that cell treatment promoted neovascularization within PDSM after implantation. The DPSM underwent tissue remodeling and muscle regeneration, and provided strong mechanical properties to successfully repair full thickness abdominal wall defect up to 3 month (UTS = 6.6 ± 2.1 MPa and E = 21.4 ± 2.3 MPa at the tissue-implant interface, UTS = 29.4 ± 8.4 MPa and E = 90.5 ± 18.1 MPa at the implant) (Figure 1). Conclusion: This study may lead to a new promising platform for large size of musculofascial tissue engineering and repair.


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