Plastic Surgery Research Council
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PSRC 60th Annual Meeting

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The Effect Of Whole Body Vibration On Life Expectancy, Cell Damage And Inflammation In A Murine Model
Henrik O. Berdel, MD1, David Moore, Medical Student2, Franklin Davis, Medical Student2, Jun Liu, BS2, Hongyu Yin, MD2, Mahmood Mozaffari, PhD, DMD2, Jack C. Yu, MD, DMD, ME Ed., FACS2, Babak Baban, PhD2
1University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 2Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, SC

PURPOSE:
Diabetes impairs wound healing, and increases surgical infection, leads to higher morbidity, mortality, hospital stay, and cost, thereby immensely affecting all surgical specialties. The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has previously been explained by insulin resistance due to obesity and glucotoxicity in the liver and skeletal muscle. However, current models attribute these precipitating factors to immune imbalance. Chronic, low-grade inflammation has been described as preceding factor. As dietary changes and increased exercise are time consuming and strenuous, thereby often resulting in low long-term compliance, alternative strategies of treatment and prevention are under investigation. Whole body vibration (WBV) has been described as a potential preventative intervention. In this study, we tested whether WBV therapy can prolong life, reduce cell damage, and decrease the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 in db/db mice.
METHODS:
4 of a total of 8 C57/BL6 db/db mice (10 week old) were subjected to high frequency (20-30 Hz), low amplitude (0.5 g) WBV therapy for 20 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 7 weeks using a fabricated vibrating platform. After 7 weeks of treatment, blood samples were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. γH2AX was measured as marker for DNA damage, and IL-17 served as index for the inflammatory response. As 3 of the 4 control mice died, the data for γH2AX and IL-17 were gathered from two separate blood drawings of the same mice. Chi-square test and student’s t-test with 2 tails were used to investigate a significant difference in survival, and in γH2AX-, and IL-17 levels, respectively.
RESULTS:
The survival of mice undergoing WBV therapy was significantly higher, with a P value of 0.047. DNA damage was significantly lower with an average γH2AX level of 0.47 % of total blood cells in the vibrated group, compared to 1.00 % of total blood cells in the control group (P = 0.006). The average IL-17 level of 5.29 % of total blood cells in the vibrated group was dramatically lower than the average of 8.50 % of total blood cells in the control mice (P = 0.018). Interestingly, although not quantified in this study, the vibrated group maintained their weight and lost less hair than the control mouse, which doubled its weight.
CONCLUSION:
WBV therapy shows incredible promise as a preventative measure, especially in the younger population at risk for developing diabetes. In addition to improved survival, db/db mice undergoing WBV therapy show less tissue damage, and signs of a decreased systemic inflammation normally seen in diabetics. This attenuated response could prove beneficial in helping prevent and delay the progression of diabetes and its complications. Ultimately, a better understanding of WBV therapy, its potential benefits, and implementation of such therapy could be a simple yet highly effective addition to dietary changes and exercise. In contrast to the later WBV may be maintained more easily, and show higher long-term compliance.


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