Plastic Surgery Research Council
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INSIGHTS INTO DIABETIC WOUND MICROCIRCULATION: A NOVEL IN VIVO MODEL
Presenter: Tanja Khosrawipour
Co-Authors: Dorfmann O; Ring A; Zeplin PH; Spindler N; Langer S
Leipzig University Hospital

Diabetes mellitus describes a dysregulation of glucose metabolism due to improper insulin secretion, reduced insulin efficacy or both. It is a well known fact that diabetic patients are likely to suffer from impaired wound healing, as diabetes strongly affects angiogenesis and neovascularisation. Until today no satisfying in vivo mice model has been established to analyze the dynamics of angiogenesis during diabetic wound healing. To be able to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes and its effect on angiogenesis a novel in vivo mouse model was established using the skinfold chamber in mice. Mutated diabetic mice (db; BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J), wildtype mice (wt; dock7Leprdb+/+m) and healthy Balb/C mice were examined, respectively. Lesions of the panniculus muscle ( 2mm) were created in the center of the transparent window chamber. The subsequent wound healing was then observed for a period of three weeks. Important analytic parameters include vessel diameter, red blood cell velocity, vascular permeability, leakage of muscle capillaries and post capillary venules. The key parameters are functional capillary density FCD and angiogenesis positive area (APA). We were able to establish a model which allows high resolution in vivo imaging of functional angiogenesis in diabetic wounds. As expected db mice showed impaired wound closure (day 22)compared to wounds of Balb /c or WT mice (day 15). FCD was lowest in diabetic mice compared to wt/balb c during the entire observation period. The dynamics of angiogenesis was also decreased in db mice marked by lowest APA levels. Significant variations in the skin buildup were observed with highest skin depth in db mice. Also, in db mice the dermis subcutaneous ratio is highly shifted towards the subcutaneous layers as opposed to wt or balb/C mice. Using this new skinfold chamber, it was possible to analyze and quantify microangiopathical changes which are essential for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic wound healing. Research in microcirculati


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